Welcome to NAPPA

NORTH AMERICAN PET PIG ASSOCIATION


Upon the advise of our respective attorneys, the Board of Directors from the Pig Advocates League and from The North American Pet Pig Association have reached a legally signed settlement. All funds have been returned to NAPPA, and PAL has signed the following statement.

 
To the Pig Community:

Thank you for your continued support and interest in preserving and protecting pet pigs. Over the past several months, you may have become aware of a disagreement that arose regarding the governance of North American Pet Pig Association (NAPPA), which caused some of NAPPA’s directors to separate from NAPPA and form Pig Advocates League (PAL). Regrettably, the disagreement became public and many hurtful and disparaging comments were made regarding NAPPA and its officers and directors. We regret such comments and any harm they caused. While we cannot undo what has been done, we can learn from our mistakes and move forward in a positive and constructive manner.

After much discussion and thoughtful consideration, we have decided to resolve our disagreement and completely part ways with NAPPA. Both NAPPA and PAL will continue their efforts in support of pet pigs. We ask that you respect our decision and continue to support pet pigs and the organizations that support them.

Sincerely,

Dianna Ciampaglione
Anna Key
Heather Knox
Brittany Sawyer

 

Preserving and protecting pet pigs since 1989, NAPPA has a love for all pigs, both big and small! We are completely run by volunteers, and have always been a non profit organization. All funds we raise go into helping pigs by providing emergency medical assistance for injured or sick pigs, spay and neuter funds, sanctuary grants to pay for straw, feed, and other supplies, sponsoring the Swine Medical Database, and so much more. We work hard to educate, whether it be pig parents or the general public who have misconceptions about pigs. Its our goal to enact changes in legislation to change pet pigs from livestock to companion animals, giving them the same rights and protections that dogs and cats are allowed. We advocate for adoption or rescue when you’re thinking of adding a pig to your family, and are here to provide a network of support with your new friend!

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North American Pet Pig Association

Since 1989, the North American Pet Pig Association has been unequivocally committed to helping improve the quality of life of pet pigs through education and grant support to the general public, pig guardians, and sanctuaries.
North American Pet Pig Association
North American Pet Pig AssociationWednesday, March 29th, 2017 at 6:14pm
Stair Safety for Pigs

Pigs are not good with stairs. It is difficult for them to get up and down stairs; many pig guardians have ramps in and out of their homes as well as portable ramps for their cars. If you live on a five-floor walk-up, you might want to think carefully before adopting a pig. Ramps are better and safer for pigs than stairs. Extra weight will make it dangerous for her to navigate the stairs.
North American Pet Pig Association
North American Pet Pig AssociationTuesday, March 28th, 2017 at 1:13pm
Pet Pigs

Cats and pigs get along fine, although generally pigs are indifferent to the cats. Pigs and dogs can get along, but the pig should never be left alone with a dog. Dogs are carnivores, and pigs are prey animals. No matter how loving a dog is or if the pig and dog have lived together for years, the pig should not be left alone with the dog. Pigs may instigate problems, but will almost always end up the injured party.
North American Pet Pig Association
North American Pet Pig AssociationTuesday, March 28th, 2017 at 12:52pm
How to Housebreak a Pet Pig

If you share your life with a pet pig, housebreaking is a necessity. They like routines, so letting your pig outside at established times quickly gets them into an elimination pattern.

If you have a fenced yard for your pig, you'll notice that she relieves herself in the same place, as far as possible from her favorite place to sleep or hang out. When housebreaking a pig, take her outside regularly to eliminate, praising her when she does.

With patience and trust your pig will learn to go outside to relieve herself.
North American Pet Pig Association
North American Pet Pig AssociationFriday, March 24th, 2017 at 12:09pm
Pig Facts!
Just like humans, pigs have individual personalities with a wide range of traits and emotions. Some pigs are more playful than others, some are more serious, some are more daring and some are shyer. Some pigs seem to handle stress better than others who may suffer with depression. Pigs experience both positive and negative emotions and can feel happiness, sadness, grief and pain. Pigs are aware of their suffering and losses.

In fact, pigs are highly sensitive animals and can become quickly bored, anxious and depressed when confined to cramped spaces and mistreated. Pigs tend to be peaceful animals and only show aggression when they or their young are threatened. Pigs are curious, insightful, enthusiastic and optimistic animals who like to be entertained and have fun.
Copyright 2017 NAPPA
North American Pet Pig Association
North American Pet Pig AssociationThursday, March 23rd, 2017 at 1:23pm
Blue-Green Algae can be Deadly to Pigs Too

It should be the epitome of pure joy: a dog leaping off the dock and splashing into a lake on a sweltering summer day. But for some dog owners, the scene can quickly turn into tragedy. The culprit: toxic blue-green algae.

“Blue-green algae can cause signs of poisoning in as little as an hour,” according to Justine Lee, DVM, a board-certified criticalist and toxicologist at the Animal Emergency & Referral Center of Minnesota. “Death has been reported within just a few hours. Signs of vomiting, collapse, seizures and coma can be almost immediate, and often it's too late to treat by the time the pet gets to a veterinary clinic.”

Although dogs are most commonly affected, blue-green algae can be toxic — and even fatal — to cats, horses, livestock, ( pigs) birds and other wildlife that drink from contaminated ponds.

“Blue-green algae can cause signs of poisoning in as little as an hour,” according to Justine Lee, DVM, a board-certified criticalist and toxicologist at the Animal Emergency & Referral Center of Minnesota. “Death has been reported within just a few hours. Signs of vomiting, collapse, seizures and coma can be almost immediate, and often it's too late to treat by the time the pet gets to a veterinary clinic.”Although dogs are most commonly affected, blue-green algae can be toxic — and even fatal — to cats, horses, livestock, ( pigs) birds and other wildlife that drink from contaminated ponds. Toxic When the Conditions Are right despite their name, blue-green algae aren’t really plants. Although they live in the water and make their own food through photosynthesis, they’re actually microscopic organisms called cyanobacteria that can be found in freshwater lakes and streams, brackish water (a combination of fresh and salt water), marine water and even backyard ponds.But not all blue-green algae are toxic. The conditions have to be right. This usually occurs in hot weather from mid-summer to fall, when the water temperatures are at their warmest. The combination of sunlight as well as nutrient-rich phosphorus and nitrogen from fertilizer runoff and decaying fish and plants encourage the organisms to grow into toxic colonies, or “blooms.”Signs Can Begin Soon After Exposure Blue-green algae can produce a number of different toxins, including microcystins and anatoxins. The signs in a dog can vary depending on the type and amount of toxin ingested.Microcystins can cause liver damage, which can lead to weakness, vomiting, diarrhea, a yellowish tint to the skin, bloody or black stools, pale or yellow gums, seizures, and coma. Anatoxins, on the other hand, tend to affect the central nervous system. Signs may include excessive drooling or tearing, muscle tremors, paralysis and difficulty breathing, resulting in a bluish tone to the skin and gums.According to the CDC, humans can be exposed to cyanobacteria toxins by skin contact, ingestion or inhaling droplets containing the cyanobacteria that have been dispersed into the air. Skin contact with the toxin may result in rashes and inflammation. Inhalation can cause difficulty breathing. Ingestion can lead to cramps, vomiting, diarrhea and neurological signs, such as tingling and numbness, as well as death.There Is No Antidote Unfortunately, diagnostic tests for blue-green algae aren’t widely available in veterinary medicine. And there’s no medication that can reverse the toxin once the dog begins to show signs. Because toxic effects can happen quickly, if you suspect your dog has been exposed to blue-green algae, it’s important to seek veterinary help immediately. When in doubt, contact your veterinarian, emergency veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center for life-saving advice!

Despite their name, blue-green algae aren’t really plants. Although they live in the water and make their own food through photosynthesis, they’re actually microscopic organisms called cyanobacteria that can be found in freshwater lakes and streams, brackish water (a combination of fresh and salt water), marine water and even backyard ponds.

But not all blue-green algae are toxic. The conditions have to be right. This usually occurs in hot weather from mid-summer to fall, when the water temperatures are at their warmest. The combination of sunlight as well as nutrient-rich phosphorus and nitrogen from fertilizer runoff and decaying fish and plants encourage the organisms to grow into toxic colonies, or “blooms.”

Signs Can Begin Soon After Exposure

Blue-green algae can produce a number of different toxins, including microcystins and anatoxins. The signs in a dog can vary depending on the type and amount of toxin ingested.

Microcystins can cause liver damage, which can lead to weakness, vomiting, diarrhea, a yellowish tint to the skin, bloody or black stools, pale or yellow gums, seizures, and coma. Anatoxins, on the other hand, tend to affect the central nervous system. Signs may include excessive drooling or tearing, muscle tremors, paralysis and difficulty breathing, resulting in a bluish tone to the skin and gums.

According to the CDC, humans can be exposed to cyanobacteria toxins by skin contact, ingestion or inhaling droplets containing the cyanobacteria that have been dispersed into the air. Skin contact with the toxin may result in rashes and inflammation. Inhalation can cause difficulty breathing. Ingestion can lead to cramps, vomiting, diarrhea and neurological signs, such as tingling and numbness, as well as death.
There Is No Antidote

Unfortunately, diagnostic tests for blue-green algae aren’t widely available in veterinary medicine. And there’s no medication that can reverse the toxin once the dog begins to show signs. Because toxic effects can happen quickly, if you suspect your dog has been exposed to blue-green algae, it’s important to seek veterinary help immediately. When in doubt, contact your veterinarian, emergency veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center for life-saving advice!


If the dog isn’t showing signs yet, the veterinarian may induce vomiting. Otherwise, the dog may require hospitalization and treatment can include intravenous fluids, medications to help control seizures, anti-vomiting medications, plasma transfusions, oxygen therapy or even mechanical ventilation to help him breathe.
When in Doubt, Stay Out
Permission to reprint from Vetstreet
North American Pet Pig Association
North American Pet Pig AssociationWednesday, March 22nd, 2017 at 4:49pm
North American Pet Pig Association (NAPPA) is a national non-profit organization. Our members receive bi-monthly educational newsletters, spay/neuter voucher benefits, and much more. Not a member? Join today by visiting our website and clicking on membership at www.petpigs.com.

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About us:
With the input, help, and encouragement of people from all walks of life, and from all over the United States and Canada, the North American Pet Pig Association (NAPPA) was organized in 1989, making it the oldest potbellied pig service organization in the United States. NAPPA is a non profit organization and holds a 501 (c)(3) tax exempt status from the Internal Revenue Service. NAPPA was organized specifically to preserve and protect the potbellied pig breed, with an emphasis on education. The activities of NAPPA are guided by the input, contributions, and energy of its members and directors. Membership in NAPPA is open to anyone interested in potbellied pigs, whether pet owners, potential pet owners, rescue/sanctuary, veterinarians, or just friends.

We encourage the use of the information on the website as well as sharing the information and links, but please do not post the information contained within the website without written permission from The North American Pet Pig Association.